Calming Storms

Karemin1094, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Synopsis: When faced with challenges, the human default is to fearfully resist what is happening and angrily look for someone to blame – not an effective strategy. When we put on the Mind of Christ, however, we peacefully accept the challenge, trusting that that help is always available and that every challenge helps us grow spiritually.

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Scriptures: Mark 4:35-41

In 1951, comedian Red Skelton and a party of friends flew to Europe, where Skelton was to appear at the London Palladium. As they were flying over the Swiss Alps, three of the airplane’s engines failed. The situation looked very grave, and the passengers began to pray.

Skelton went into one of his best comic routines to distract them from the emergency as the plane lost height, coming closer and closer to the ominous-looking mountains. At the last moment the pilot spied a large field among the slopes and made a perfect landing. Skelton broke the relieved silence by saying, “Now, ladies and gentlemen, you may return to the evil habits you gave up 20 minutes ago.”

Skelton’s joking advice underscored the truth that whatever religious “commitments” those terrified passengers may have made were strictly temporary. The minute they stepped safely out of that aircraft, all deals with God were off.

But for the disciples of Jesus, there were no temporary commitments or cancellations. Once they got into that boat with Him, they were on board for the duration. There were times when the disciples wondered what they had gotten themselves into with Jesus. Today’s story was one of those occasions.

We are continuing with the Gospel of Mark, the most chronological of the four gospels, meaning that the events in Jesus’ life are laid out in the order in which they actually occurred. Two Sundays ago, we looked at an event early in Jesus’ ministry, where he was accused of being demon-possessed by not only the religious leaders but also by his own family because they couldn’t understand why he treated the perfect strangers who came to him for Torah learning and/or healing with family-level devotion.

Jesus continued his ministry of teaching and healing beside the Sea of Galilee. His favorite way of teaching the people was to tell them parables, but he explained the meaning of the parables to the disciples in private. On this particular day, he taught what the kingdom of God is like using several parables: the sower, the lamp under the bushel backet, the growing seed, and the mustard seed.

He used the parables to help the listeners imagine the tremendous potential within the kingdom of God. The smallest of actions may not seem like much, but under the right conditions, those actions can yield tremendous benefits not only for us personally, but for everyone. With God, all things are possible.

And that brings us to our scripture reading for today. It had gotten late, and Jesus was tired. He was human after all. He needed to get away from the crowd and get some rest, so he asked his disciples to take him over to the eastern side of the sea. Even then, he couldn’t totally escape because some other boats followed.

I’m sure Jesus fully intended for them to reach the other side without incident, but the Sea of Galilee can be treacherous. The valley where it is located is more like a tunnel with hills and mountains on both sides, so if the wind is blowing through there, it creates a wind tunnel that can cause the sea to become a churning nightmare.

In that case, riding in a boat is a lot like trying to ride on the back of a bucking bronco. That is what Jesus and his disciples experienced. Now, did Jesus do anything wrong? No. Did his disciples do anything wrong? No. No one did anything wrong. That’s just life.

But how did the disciples respond? They woke Jesus up saying, “Teacher, do you not care that we are perishing?” They were afraid, and they were angry, and it was Jesus’ fault because how could he possibly be asleep at a time like this?

You see, when life doesn’t go our way, we tend to take it personally. Very personally. We have this attitude that says, “Stuff doesn’t just happen. Someone has to be at fault, and that someone has to pay!” Then we try to figure out who is to blame, so they can pay us whatever it is we think we’re entitled to.

We’re like little children that way, aren’t we? We want life be like an overindulgent parent and spoil us rotten. We want life to say, “Aww, did I make you feel bad? Here … have a cookie.”

But that’s just the mind of me, right? It’s just the part of our mind that believes that life is supposed to revolve all around us because we are the star of this show – the MVP. That’s why we resist life so much because the truth is life doesn’t revolve around us.

Storms happen. Accidents happen. Pandemics happen. That’s life. Many Christians mistakenly believe that following the Lord will spare them from life’s storms; however, following the Lord often leads us into more storms, more challenges. The disciples learned that lesson early in their walk with Jesus.

In contrast to the mind of me, the Mind of Christ doesn’t resist life. It doesn’t resist life’s challenges. It accepts challenges as part of life. It accepts the way God designed life, and God designed life to be challenging. God wisely and thoughtfully designed life to be challenging in order to help us grow spiritually – not to spoil us rotten.

As parents, it is never your intention to spoil your kids rotten, right? You also want to provide the best conditions for them to learn and grow into mature, responsible, productive, and happy members of society. God wants the same for his children, but we’re learning to become mature, responsible, productive, and happy members of not just a national or even a global society but of a universal society.

So, when we are faced with storms, we need to awaken the Mind of Christ within us to help us deal with them because the mind of me will only scream and whine. When we put on the Mind of Christ, our perspective changes, and that change in perspective gives us peace even while the storm is still raging.

How does putting on the Mind of Christ help calm the storms in our lives? It helps to calm the reactionary emotional wind and waves generated by the mind of me so that we can deal with the situation with the wisdom and strength of the Mind of Christ.

First, putting on the Mind of Christ helps us take life’s challenges less personally. I learned a wonderful proverb from an unlikely source – some smart aleck boy I knew from high school but would have never thought in a million years that he would grow up to be a “wise guy.”

Sorry … I couldn’t resist that play on words.

Anyway, years ago, I was working down at the corner mini-mart, and Wayne Dunlap was going through a tough time. I mean, he was really going through quite a storm. Everything in his life was going wrong, and I felt really bad for him. I told him that I was sorry he was having such a tough time, and he said, “Well (shrug shoulders), it is what it is.”

It is what it is. What a great attitude! That attitude comes from the Mind of Christ. When we accept life as it is, we stop getting so angry and looking for someone to blame. We stop taking our anger out on ourselves and others. We stop expecting life to make it up to us somehow and holding onto bitterness until it does.

Putting on the Mind of Christ restores our faith. Jesus asked his disciples, Why are you afraid? Have you still no faith?” The disciples had just spent all that time with Jesus. They heard his teachings. They witnessed his healing powers. Yet they still had no faith.

If Jesus were alive today during this storm, and we lacked faith, he would have every right to say to us, “You come to church every Sunday. You study the Bible. You learn about me, both my words and my works. And yet you still have no faith?”

“You still think that you are in complete control of life, that you can handle life’s storms, that you have the wisdom and the strength and the power to handle them all by yourself? But then when you realize the truth, you cry out to me in anger and blame? You cry, ‘Don’t you care about me, Lord?’”

Where is my faith? That is a great question to ask ourselves when we are experiencing the mind of me’s emotional reactivity to life’s storms.

But what is faith really? Faith is a loaded word these days. Some people believe faith is belief in specific church doctrines or stances on certain political or social issues, but our faith in these things will do absolutely nothing for us when faced with life’s storms.

Faith is what we believe about God and our relationship with him. If we truly believe that we have eternal life in Christ, then we will not fear death. Our bodies can die, but we can’t die. Our consciousness lives on as part of the image of God, a thread interwoven into the eternal fabric of Life.

Those of us who are not afraid of death may still be afraid of pain. I get that. I don’t like pain either. No one likes pain, but just as with all challenges, pain is greatly increased by our reactivity and resistance to it. If we can peacefully accept the pain, then our suffering isn’t as bad. Our experience of it changes.

Faith is also believing that we are God’s child – God’s beloved child – really believing that God loves us. If God is for us, then who or what can be against us? No one and nothing. In fact, did you realize that God created an entire army of angels to be at our beck-and-call. Yes, he did! He created them specifically to help us. That’s how much he loves us.

The angels love us too, but we must ask them for help because they can’t violate our free will. We feel so alone in the world because often we’re too proud to ask for help. The angels would love to help us, so don’t feel silly about asking Archangel Michael for strength and protection or Archangel Raphael for healing or Archangel Gabriel for help with communication. And the Lord is always with us and more than willing to help if we call on Him. He was right there the whole time in that boat with the disciples.

But what do you think the disciples were doing before, in their extreme desperation, they finally decided to wake Jesus up? I mean, these guys were seasoned fisherman, so I’m sure this wasn’t the first time they experienced rough seas. Maybe they tried to turn the sail and catch the wind to outrun the storm. Maybe they tried to row through the waves, but they were too high. Maybe they tried to bail the water out of the boat, but the water was coming in faster than they could bail it out.

They were all too busy feeling afraid and trying to save themselves to let go of control. When we have faith in God, then we know there is nothing to be afraid of. And we know that whenever we are in trouble, we can always ask for help, and it will be granted. Jesus demonstrated this faith when he calmed the storm. He said, “Peace, be still!” and it was done.

The disciples were in awe of this, but Jesus was human just like us. The only difference is that he had tremendous faith. He taught us that if we had enough faith, we could move mountains just as he could calm storms.

Putting on the Mind of Christ restores our trust. Another great question to ask ourselves during life’s storms is, “Do I know the Lord in theory, or do I know the Lord in trust?” This personal self with its mind of me doesn’t trust anything or anyone. It is an incorrigible cynic. That is a very dysfunctional attitude to have toward life. It closes us down, and that only hurts us.

We are here to learn, so there is no shame in actually learning even if we need to do it the hard way. There is a lot we don’t know until we do, and no one is going to judge us for that. God designed this world to help us grow spiritually, and everyone grows spiritually here – some more gracefully than others.

We can trust that whatever personal challenges we face have a purpose. Our life is in the hands of our Higher Self, and we can trust that it will bring us exactly the lessons we need to grow spiritually at exactly the pace we need. Our life is in very good hands.

Because you see, it is our Higher Self’s intention to free us from everything that keeps us enslaved by the personal self and the mind of me – everything that causes us to distrust and everything that makes us feel small, fearful, lacking, and unworthy.

So, when storms happen, we need to accept what is, trust God, and learn whatever it is we need to learn as gracefully as we can knowing that it’s all for our good.

You are not this small self that you see. You are an eternal being, and the total expanse of your life is far vaster than the one you’re experiencing right now. Actually, it is as infinite as God. This life is the blink of an eye compared to your whole life in Christ.

When you can view the challenges you face in this fleeting life through the broader lens of your eternal soul, and your soul’s development throughout all the eons of time, they don’t seem nearly as big a deal.

The challenges you face may not make sense in the context of this nanosecond of your life at this place and time, but our personal self isn’t supposed to know – and really can’t know – what the soul is up to. That work is sacred and therefore beyond its understanding. So, you must simply trust that every experience, every challenge serves your soul’s growth in some way.

The same is true for all humanity, so we can trust that the soul of all of humanity is in the good, loving hands of Spirit and is growing spiritually through the challenges we are facing today. Knowing this truth stills all storms and gives us peace.

Let’s pray together: Lord, we are in awe of the power of your faith, and it is our greatest desire to have the kind of faith that can move mountains and calm storms. When we are faced with storms in our lives, help us to release control and awaken the Mind of Christ within us. AMEN.

Resources

Admin. “Mark 4: 35-41.” Bible.org, 2 Feb. 2009, bible.org/illustration/mark-435-41.

Lawrence, Bill. “1. Stormology 101: From Theory to Trust through Life’s Storms” Bible.org, 2 Apr. 2008, bible.org/seriespage/1-stormology-101-theory-trust-through-lifes-storms-mark-435-41.